Girlfriend Warned Police A Year Ago That Warner Was Building Bombs


A new report shows that Nashville Police were told over a year ago that Anthony Quinn Warner was building a bomb in his RV. Police have identified Warner as the person responsible for the Christmas Day bombing on Second Avenue that took his life and injured three others.

According to recently uncovered documents, Warner's girlfriend warned police in August 2019 of alleged threats he made, despite the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation saying Warner was "not on our radar."

According to The Tennessean, attorney Raymond Throckmorton III called police on August 21, 2019 to the residence of Warner's girlfriend, who lived about a mile and a half from Warner, where she said that he was "building bombs in the RV trailer at his residence." The police report notes that the woman was experiencing a mental health crisis at the time. Metro Nashville Police passed the information along to the FBI, but no other actions appear to have been taken against Warner.

Throckmorton, who represented the woman at the time, had previously served as Warner's attorney years ago, told police that he "frequently talks about the military and bomb making" and that he "knows what he is doing and is capable of making a bomb."

"She was so convincing that morning, and so distraught, that I decided in the front yard in the middle of all those police officers on the spot, that even though it was a former client of mine, that somebody needed to go check it out right then," said Throckmorton.

Police went to Warner's residence, but no one answered after they knocked several times. According to the report, officers saw the RV behind the house but they could not see inside of it. They did, however, note that there were "several security cameras and wires attached to an alarm sign on the front door."

A spokesperson for the FBI said that police called Throckmorton days after the incident to have officers interview Warner or go on his property, but that the attorney refused, saying Warner "did not care for the police." Throckmorton disputed this claim by saying he no long represented Warner nor was he a criminal defense attorney.

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